ARCHIVIO HOME PAGE

SPECIALI

FLASH NEWS

  • • Ultime News
  • • Archivio News
  • ANTEPRIME

    RITRATTI IN CELLULOIDE

    MOVIES & DVD

  • • In programmazione
  • • Di prossima uscita
  • • New Entry
  • • Archivio
  • • Blu-ray & Dvd
  • CINEMA & PITTURA

    CINESPIGOLATURE

    EVENTI

    TOP 20

  • • Films
  • • Attrici
  • • Attori
  • • Registi
  • LA REDAZIONE

    • Registi

    • Attori

    • Attrici

    • Personaggi

    • L'Intervista

    • Dietro le quinte

    Indiana Jones e la Ruota del Destino

    INDIANA JONES E LA RUOTA DEL DESTINO

    Aggiornamenti freschi di giornata! (2 Dicembre 2022) - Primo trailer Ufficiale, poster e titolo .... [continua]

    Il gatto con gli stivali - L'ultimo desiderio

    IL GATTO CON GLI STIVALI - L'ULTIMO DESIDERIO

    Dal 7 Dicembre .... [continua]

    Longing

    LONGING

    New Entry - Richard Gere protagonista della pluripremiata dramedy - Longing alla lettera .... [continua]

    The Making of

    THE MAKING OF

    New Entry - Richard Gere in una storia romantica che intreccia vita reale e .... [continua]

    Proxy

    PROXY

    New Entry - Blake Lively protagonista in un Sci-Fi che inscena una nuova vita .... [continua]

    Bones And All

    BONES AND ALL

    Dalla 79. Mostra del Cinema di Venezia - Timothée Chalamet e Taylor Russell sono .... [continua]

    Glass Onion - Knives Out

    GLASS ONION - KNIVES OUT

    Sequel del film Cena con delitto-Knives Out (2019) con il ritorno del bizzarro detective Benoit .... [continua]

    Poker Face

    POKER FACE

    Dalla 17. Festa del Cinema di Roma (13-23 Ottobre, Auditorium della Musica) - Alice .... [continua]

    Black Beauty: Autobiografia di un cavallo

    BLACK BEAUTY: AUTOBIOGRAFIA DI UN CAVALLO

    I recuperati di CelluloidPortraits - Nell'ennesimo adattamento di un romanzo del 1877 scritto da .... [continua]

    Medieval

    MEDIEVAL

    RECENSIONE - Nella Boemia del XIV secolo il debole re Venceslao di Lussemburgo fatica a .... [continua]

    Home Page > Movies & DVD > 99 Homes

    99 HOMES: NEL VOLTO DELLA POVERTA' GLOBALE DIPINTO DA RAMIN BAHRANI UN SENZATETTO D'ECCEZIONE (ANDREW GARFIELD) ALLA RISCOSSA

    Dalla 71. Mostra Internazionale d’Arte Cinematografica - Preview in English by Guy Lodge, www.variety.com - Dall'11 Febbraio

    "Il fenomeno di povertà al 99% è globale. In tutto il mondo, l’uomo comune non può più dedicarsi a un duro lavoro onesto e aspettarsi di raggiungere la prosperità di fronte a un contesto di avidità e corruzione. Quando un uomo si trova di fronte al plotone di esecuzione, si schiera dalla parte del suo carnefice? Esiste una scelta diversa da quella di fare un patto con il diavolo?"
    Il regista, co-sceneggiatore e co-soggettista Ramin Bahrani

    (99 Homes; USA 2014; Drammatico; 112'; Produz.: Noruz Films; Distribuz.: Lucky Red)

    Locandina italiana 99 Homes

    Rating by
    Celluloid Portraits:



    See SHORT SYNOPSIS
    Trailer

    Titolo in italiano: 99 Homes

    Titolo in lingua originale: 99 Homes

    Anno di produzione: 2014

    Anno di uscita: 2016

    Regia: Ramin Bahrani

    Sceneggiatura: Ramin Bahrani e Amir Naderi

    Soggetto: Storia di Ramin Bahrani e Bahareh Azimi.

    Cast: Andrew Garfield (Dennis Nash)
    Michael Shannon (Rick Carver)
    Laura Dern (Lynn Nash)
    Tim Guinee (Frank Greene)
    Noah Lomax (Connor Nash)
    Cynthia Santiago (Cynthia Greene)
    Clancy Brown (William Freeman)
    Alex Aristidis (Alex Greene)
    Randy Austin (Sceriffo Anderon)
    Carl Palmer (Sceriffo Carl)
    Jonathan Tabler (Avv. Adam Bailey)
    Don Brady (Mr. Baldwin)
    Manu Narayan (Khanna)
    Cullen Moss (Bill)
    Nadiyah Skyy Taylor (Tamika)
    Cast completo

    Musica: Antony Partos e Matteo Zingales

    Costumi: Meghan Kasperlik

    Scenografia: Alex DiGerlando

    Fotografia: Bobby Bukowski

    Montaggio: Ramin Bahrani

    Makeup: Remi Savva (direttrice trucco); Amy Wood (direttrice acconciature)

    Casting: Douglas Aibel e Tracy Kilpatrick

    Scheda film aggiornata al: 25 Aprile 2022

    Sinossi:

    IN BREVE:

    Un padre lotta per riavere la casa dopo che la sua famiglia è stata sfrattata, lavorando come agente immobiliare, ma si tratta di un impiego che è per lui anche fonte di grande frustrazione.

    Dennis Nash (Andrew Garfield) perde la sua casa a causa del pignoramento. Disperato, finalmente trova lavoro come agente immobiliare presso l'azienda che si è presa la sua casa e ben presto non solo comincia a sfrattare i proprietari delle abitazioni, ma aiuta il suo capo a sottrarre soldi al governo. Mentre i suoi problemi finanziari scompaiono, la sua coscienza comincia a distruggerlo.

    IN DETTAGLIO:

    Siamo a Orlando, Florida. Un film incentrato sulla crisi immobiliare. Dennis (Andrew Garfield, nel suo primo ruolo diverso da Peter Parker da The Social Network, 2010) è un giovane padre di famiglia sfrattato dalla sua casa da un agente immobiliare che lavora per le banche: Mike (Michael Shannon), uomo affamato di potere che gira con una pistola. Nella situazione drammatica nella quale si trova, farebbe di tutto per riavere indietro la sua casa. Dennis finisce per accettare di lavorare per Mike e si trova così ad avere a che fare con la corruzione dell’industria immobiliare. Nel momento in cui i suoi problemi finanziari iniziano a sanarsi, la sua coscienza è ormai gravemente danneggiata e i rimorsi lo perseguitano.

    SHORT SYNOPSIS:

    A father struggles to get back the home that his family was evicted from by working for the greedy real estate broker who's the source of his frustration.

    Commento critico (a cura di PATRIZIA FERRETTI)

    (Coming Soon...)

    Secondo commento critico (a cura di GUY LODGE, www.variety.com)

    MICHAEL SHANNON AND ANDREW GARFIELD DELIVER DYNAMIC PERFORMANCES IN RAMIN BAHRANI'S FURIOUS STUDY OF CORRUPT ONE PERCENT PRIVILEGE.

    The number of properties referred to in the title of Ramin Bahrani’s fifth feature may have a literal narrative significance, but it must also refer to the population percentage routinely branded as the victims of Occupy-era economic downturn. The perils of illegally gained One Percent privilege make for engrossing, high-stakes viewing in “99 Homes,” which sees Andrew Garfield’s blue-collared Florida everyman enter a Faustian pact with Michael Shannon’s white-blazered real-estate shark. Following the lead of 2012’s underrated “At Any Price” in matching the socially conscious topicality of Bahrani’s early films to the demands of broader-brush melodrama, this dynamically acted, unapologetically contrived pic reps the filmmaker’s best chance to date of connecting with a wider audience — one likely to share the helmer’s bristling anger over corruptly maintained class divides in modern-day America.



    Just as Jason Reitman’s “Up in the Air” — a film that took a mildly more sanguine view of the last decade’s far-reaching financial crisis — made its viewers endure repeated scenes of humiliating personal disenfranchisement at the hands of corporate America, so does “99 Homes.” Where George Clooney’s professional downsizer spent much of Reitman’s film coolly relieving people of their jobs, here it’s an unblinking Michael Shannon paying house calls to deliver even worse news to hard-up Orlando residents: That their homes have been foreclosed, and that they have mere minutes to pack their things and find new lodgings. It’s a scenario we’ve winced through in other cinematic portraits of down-at-heel America, though rarely has it been quite so cruelly presented. The very first image in the film is of the blood-sprayed bathroom wall of one evictee who preferred to take his life than exit his property.

    Shannon, as hardened,

    duplicitous real estate broker Rick Carver, grants such horrors little more than a disinterested glance before taking a drag on his e-cigarette and moving on to the next victim. The script, co-written by Bahrani and veteran Iranian filmmaker Amir Naderi from a story by Bahareh Azimi, makes no attempt to present Carver as anything but a pale-suited Satan from the get-go. Still, he’s rather an admirable villain in one sense: A wholly self-made property baron who has clawed his way up from working-class roots by gaming the government at every available opportunity, Carver reasons that the American Dream does not come to those who wait.

    When sent to evict single father Dennis Nash (Garfield) from his lifelong family home, Carver recognizes similar class-scaling potential in the young man’s enterprising defiance. An unemployed construction worker willing to do anything to get his pre-teen son Connor (Noah Lomax) and weathered, resilient mom Lynn

    (Laura Dern, currently the go-to actress for weathered, resilient moms) out of a rough downtown motel heavily populated with other foreclosed families, Nash reluctantly accepts Carver’s offer of piecemeal employment, cleaning and repairing houses recently seized by his unlikely new benefactor.

    It isn’t long before Carver has adopted Nash as a full-time protege, training him in eviction protocol and letting him in on the dirty secrets of his success: He generates substantial extra income by removing key fittings and appliances from abandoned houses and charging the government for their replacement. Despite Carver’s instincts, Nash isn’t to the manner born, repeatedly balking at the job’s more confrontational duties — but the lure of his rapidly increasing income, and the imminent return of his house, ultimately outweighs his moral reservations.

    Nash’s quandary, then, reflects Bahrani’s view of America’s social problem. It’s not that financial recovery is impossible, the film posits, but that it

    must come at the direct inverse cost to another party, leading to an economy built entirely around the individual. It’s not a subtle argument, and its dramatization is often schematic: At one point, Nash is required to oversee an eviction that mirrors his own family’s earlier ordeal almost beat for beat. But Bahrani’s rhetoric is undeniably rousing, and not without compelling supplementary specifics. The legal and administrative loopholes that enable Carver’s profitable schemes and the mass displacement of respectable home-owners are articulated here in some detail, though the film’s principal approach is emotional rather than analytical. Carver himself would not approve: “Don’t get emotional about real estate,” he advises Nash, quite reasonably, though his motivations are still entirely material. Where the sentimental would argue that houses are worth only the lives inside them, Carver takes a different tack: “They’re boxes. Big boxes, small boxes. What matters is how many you’ve

    got.”

    Like the devil that gets all the best tunes, it’s Shannon — ideally cast in a role that fully capitalizes on his dauntless stare and imposing, almost-handsome physicality — who gets the choice lines here, though his half-snarling, half-purring delivery lends a certain snap even to clunkier ones. (Coming from his lips, the words “I see green skies ahead” seem a genuinely ominous mission statement.) It’s a pleasure, meanwhile, to see Garfield on screen, unencumbered by a lycra Spidey-suit, for the first time since his 2010 breakthrough in “The Social Network.” Always good at deeply internalized anguish and barely-masked vulnerability, he convincingly navigates his character through some tricky psychological transitions, maintaining sympathy and credibility even in the film’s ramped-up (and somewhat trumped-up) thriller finale. Ensemble work is excellent across the board, with those cast as the various evictees contributing a particularly vivid gallery of one-scene performances, ranging in tone from

    white-hot fury to silent desolation.

    On the technical front, the throbbing percussion-and-electronica score by Anthony Partos and Matteo Zingales stands out as Bahrani’s most substantial miscalculation. Oddly dated and loudly present in nearly every scene, the music conveys bleak, urgent anxiety from the outset, leaving the film little room for tonal maneuver. The sonic underlining also seems unnecessary with the actors already doing such a dexterous job of delivering Bahrani’s stinging, barely-submerged subtext.

    Serving as his own editor, as he did on his first three films, Bahrani keeps the narrative at a rolling boil throughout; d.p. Bobby Bukowski’s blunt, unfussy digital compositions, which often allow direct light sources to overwhelm the frame, also effectively contribute to the sense of a film with little time for the luxury of beauty. The most invaluable below-the-line contribution, meanwhile, comes from production designer Alex DiGerlando, who furnishes the film’s broad range of Floridian boxes — big

    and small, flashy and fetid — with a wealth of subliminal personal and social history, even as they stand empty.






    trailer ufficiale (sub ITA):

    Links:

    • Laura Dern

    • Andrew Garfield

    • Michael Shannon

    • Tim Guinee

    • Cullen Moss

    • Noah Lomax

    1 | 2 | 3

    Galleria Video:

    99 Homes - trailer (versione originale sottotitolata)

    99 Homes - trailer (versione originale)

    TOP 20

    Dai il tuo voto


    <- torna alla pagina Movies & DVD

    The Menu

    THE MENU

    RECENSIONE - Dai produttori Adam McKay e Betsy Koch di Don't Look Up e Fresh, .... [continua]

    The Woman King

    THE WOMAN KING

    RECENSIONE in ANTEPRIMA - Con Viola Davis nel ruolo di Nasisca, generale dell’unità militare tutta .... [continua]

    Una notte violenta e silenziosa

    UNA NOTTE VIOLENTA E SILENZIOSA

    RECENSIONE in ANTEPRIMA - Dal 1° Dicembre .... [continua]

    Silent Night

    SILENT NIGHT

    RECENSIONE in ANTEPRIMA - Keira Knightley protagonista - al fianco di Lily-Rose Depp, Annabelle Wallis, .... [continua]

    Spirited - Magia di Natale

    SPIRITED-MAGIA DI NATALE

    Dal 18 Novembre su Apple TV+ - RECENSIONE - Nell'adattamento in chiave musicale del racconto .... [continua]

    Come per disincanto - E vissero infelici e scontenti

    COME PER DISINCANTO - E VISSERO INFELICI E SCONTENTI

    Dal 18 Novembre in streaming su Disney+ - Sequel metà animato e metà live action .... [continua]

    Black Panther: Wakanda Forever

    BLACK PANTHER: WAKANDA FOREVER

    RECENSIONE in ANTEPRIMA - Dal 9 Novembre

    "Distruggi una cosa che non conta solo ....
    [continua]