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    Home Page > Movies & DVD > Sognare è vivere

    SOGNARE E' VIVERE: DAL ROMANZO AUTOBIOGRAFICO DI AMOS OZ ALL'OPERA PRIMA ALLA REGIA DI NATALIE PORTMAN

    Dal 68° Festival del Cinema di Cannes (13-24 maggio 2015) - Dall'8 Giugno - PREVIEW in ENGLISH by PETER DEBRUGE (www.variety.com)

    (A Tale of Love and Darkness; ISRAELE/USA 2015; Drammatico; 98'; Produz.: Handsomecharlie Films/Ram Bergman Productions; Distribuz.: Altre storie)

    Locandina italiana Sognare è vivere

    Rating by
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    See SHORT SYNOPSIS
    Trailer

    Titolo in italiano: Sognare è vivere

    Titolo in lingua originale: A Tale of Love and Darkness

    Anno di produzione: 2015

    Anno di uscita: 2017

    Regia: Natalie Portman

    Sceneggiatura: Natalie Portman

    Soggetto: Ispirato al romanzo autobiografico Una storia di
    amore e di tenebra
    (2004) di Amos Oz, il film racconta l'infanzia e la gioventù dell'autore, nel Mandato britannico della Palestina, e i primi anni dello Stato.

    Cast: Natalie Portman (Fania Oz)
    Gilad Kahana (Arieh)
    Amir Tessler (Amos)
    Moni Moshonov (Amos vecchio) (Voce)
    Ohad Knoller (Israel Zarchi)
    Makram Khoury (Al Hilwani)
    Alexander Peleg (Amos vecchio)
    Neta Riskin (Haya)
    Rotem Keinan (Tsvi)
    Tomer Kapon (Il pioniere)

    Musica: Nicholas Britell

    Costumi: Li Alembik

    Scenografia: Arad Sawat

    Fotografia: Slawomir Idziak

    Montaggio: Andrew Mondshein e Hervé Schneid

    Effetti Speciali: Rafi Ben Aharon (Supervisore)

    Casting: Hila Yuval

    Scheda film aggiornata al: 22 Giugno 2017

    Sinossi:

    Sognare è Vivere è basato sui ricordi di Amos Oz, cresciuto a Gerusalemme negli anni precedenti alla nascita dello Stato di Israele con i suoi genitori: il padre Arieh, studioso e intellettuale e la madre Fania sognatrice e poetica. La sua è una delle tante famiglie ebree scappate dall’Europa in Palestina negli anni tra il 1930 e il 1940 per sfuggire alle persecuzioni. Il padre Arieh è cautamente ottimista nei confronti del futuro. Fania invece vuole molto di più. Dopo la paura della guerra e della fuga, la noia della quotidianità opprime il suo animo. Infelice della vita matrimoniale e intellettualmente soffocata, per rallegrare le sue giornate e divertire suo figlio Amos di dieci anni, Fania inventa storie di avventure e di viaggi nel deserto. Amos è completamente affascinato quando sua madre gli legge poesie, gli spiega le parole e la lingua in un modo che avrebbe poi influenzato la sua scrittura e la sua stessa vita. Quando l’indipendenza non porta il rinnovato senso della vita che Fania aveva sperato, la donna scivola nella solitudine e nella depressione. Incapace di aiutarla, Amos deve imparare a dirle addio prima del tempo. Mentre assiste alla nascita di una nazione, deve cominciare ad affrontare un suo personale nuovo inizio.

    Short Synopsis:

    A drama based on the memoir of Amos Oz, a writer, journalist, and advocate of a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

    Commento critico (a cura di PETER DEBRUGE, www.variety.com)

    NATALIE PORTMAN WROTE, DIRECTED AND STARRED IN THIS WELL-MEANING BUT DREARY ADAPTATION OF AMOS OZ'S AUTOBIOGRAPHY

    For those who love the writing of Amos Oz, the Israeli storyteller’s autobiographical “A Tale of Love and Darkness” illuminates his reasons for picking up the pen in the first place, pointing to his relationship with his doting (and long-suffering) mother above all. It’s perfectly obvious why Oz felt compelled to honor his mother Fania’s memory in print, but not necessarily as clear to understand why Natalie Portman felt so fiercely drawn to the character — to the degree that she spent years developing Oz’s melancholy memoir to be her feature writing-director debut, appearing as the beatific Fania herself. Most likely, it was simply a case of her being touched by Oz’s work and wanting to share that emotional experience with others, though her drearily empathetic film lacks whatever universality has made “Tale” such

    an international phenomenon, and will rely on Portman’s name to attract interest beyond Israel.

    Audiences often fool themselves into thinking they know a movie star by her work, as if the roles reveal an actress’ inner soul. When the alchemy is right, they often do, although Portman has remained strangely enigmatic on this front — a clear consequence of her versatility, which ranges from her star-making theatrical role as Anne Frank to the inscutable wax effigy that is Queen Padme Amidala, which brought her the greatest international exposure. Here, in a project drawn from someone else’s autobiography, we glimpse her most personal work: a portrait of the artist as a young man that doubles as a reflection of its director’s formative influences as well.

    Like Oz, Portman was born in Israel, surrounded by the stories of her immigrant family’s past, and with this film, told entirely in Hebrew, she illustrates how those

    ingredients come to define an artistic identity: specifically Oz’s, though we’re free to speculate upon Portman’s own attachments to the material as well. As a child, Amos (played by Amir Tessler) couldn’t imagine himself ever becoming a writer — that was the vocation practiced by his overly serious father (Gilad Kahana). “I’m not sensitive,” Amos insists, swearing that he’s more cut out for work as a farmer, or maybe a dog-killer. But one isn’t always free to decide such things for oneself. When it comes to art, certain feelings demand to be expressed.

    Amos may be the film’s main character, but its focus feels firmly turned toward his parents. Theirs is a strangely loveless marriage, the sort in which Fania (Portman) never could have imagined herself. She was a romantic, raised within a certain degree of privilege in Poland, who’d pictured her life one day resembling the stuff of the literature

    she devoured, only to marry a second-rate writer.

    In brief fantasy interludes, we glimpse the handsome partner she would have preferred: a strong, strapping lad who couldn’t be more different from the man she married. At other points, she regales Amos with stories from the old country (or, on occasion, spun from whole cloth), their endings invariably tragic, heavy with regret and the weight of wrong choices.

    Portman dramatizes these tales, inserting them into a more direct re-creation of Oz’s childhood, circa 1945 — two years before the establishment of Israel’s statehood, during the window when Jerusalem was still under British mandate — and forward into the violence and turmoil that followed its independence, setting the course for the unrest that still taxes the nation today. While that historical context functions mostly as backdrop to the more intimate family story, these anecdotal glimpses into Israeli’s past are among the film’s most interesting

    qualities, at least as far as export is concerned.

    So often, films from Israel and Palestine concentrate on the conflict between these two cultures, rather than life as it is experienced on the ground — that is, struggling to find some normalcy amid shootings and bombs. As Israeli coming-of-age tales go, though, “A Tale of Love and Darkness” lacks the vivid detail and spark of Nir Bergman’s 2010 treasure, “Intimate Grammar” (adapted from David Grossman’s novel), opting instead for a more somber portrayal of life in Jerusalem, one whose virtually monochromatic color palette has been pushed toward the dolorous blue end of the spectrum.

    Whereas “Grammar’s” unique conceit was the fact its protagonist had hit a sort of pre-pubescent wall, then stopped growing, there’s no explaining why Amos doesn’t age in Portman’s film. Over almost half a decade’s time, he’s played by the same wide-eyed but somewhat wooden young actor, most likely

    for continuity’s sake. Then, skipping forward nearly a decade to his years in the Kibbutz Hulda, the film has him played as a young man by a striking lookalike. Portman, on the other hand, changes radically in her demeanor over the course of the film. Fania died at age 38, the narrator informs us early on, and in those last years, we see her glowing energy fade to loneliness and despair, as if the cinders burning inside her were slowly being extinguished.

    With no affection from her husband — and nothing but direct hostility from her mother-in-law — Fania comes to view Amos as perhaps her only reason for living. She lavishes affection on the boy, curling up beside him in bed and telling her stories, or better yet, giving him guidelines that will serve him later, when he starts to invent his own. If Amos should ever choose to lie

    about someone, she instructs him, he must remember to be generous. Oz has clearly taken this advice to heart in the reverential way he later depicts Fania, now old enough to be her father. Her woes might just as easily have driven him to therapy, but in this telling, she’s a source of inspiration to him — and clearly to the writer-director-star who was so determined to play her.

    Pressbook:

    PRESSBOOK ITALIANO di SOGNARE E' VIVERE

    Links:

    • Natalie Portman (Regista)

    • Natalie Portman

    1 | 2

    Galleria Video:

    Sognare è vivere - trailer

    Sognare è vivere - trailer (versione originale sottotitolata in inglese) - A Tale of Love and Darkness

    Sognare è vivere - clip 'Assenza di ricordi'

    Sognare è vivere - clip 'È meglio essere sensibili'

    Sognare è vivere - clip 'Il bagno'

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